Tag Archives: Cochon Heritage BBQ

Back Again – Heritage BBQ Comes to Town

As a child (or a yoot), I was never too pleased when summer started winding down. I had to change when I woke up, I had to get my haircut, and I had to start cramming in all of that summer reading that I dilly-dallied on all summer. But now, as an adult who does not have a 12 week vacation, then end of summer brings a different set of feelings. As we move through August, we can all look forward to football and the return of the Cochon Heritage BBQ event on August 30.

Cochon Heritage BBQ

First Memphis was treated to a Cochon 555 event, won by Kelly English. Then we hosted the first ever Heritage BBQ event, which was a feast of epic proportions. Now, Heritage BBQ is back in Memphis on August 30 for another demonstration on what can happen when fine chefs mix excellent technique with the highly-flavorful heritage breed pork that will be on display.

Cochon Heritage BBQ

The Cochon events are the brainchild of Brady Lowe. He puts on events across the country to showcase heritage breed pork and the chefs that can take it to the next level. Here’s what he says about the event:

“My goal is to create team building events that showcase the growth potential of BBQ restaurants buying whole heritage pigs from family farms. The process and judging format is my best approach at whole animal utilization, whereas we do not create a burden on small farmers to hold a surplus unwanted animal parts during any part of our competition. The events are hyper-local and they create word-of-mouth marketing for family farms. It’s an honor to have a national spotlight right and develop a message with a deeper meaning, far beyond competition BBQ. Today, we are reaching out to people who care about the conversation of local food made by real people.”

Cochon Heritage BBQ

Last year, we gathered on the rooftop of the Peabody for an opening night kick-off party. This year’s festivities will take place at Beale Street Landing. I’m pumped about the new location, because I think it has a lot of potential. I imagine that this will my first official visit to the Landing, so I am excited to get some great use out of a project that has really taken a long time to get of the ground/river.

Last year the food was insane, as chefs from across America descended on Memphis to bring their take on whole-hog utilization with interesting takes on classic barbecue styling. Each team is responsible for six dishes that represent bone, muscle, pull, stew, mayo, and mustard.

Cochon Heritage BBQ

This year Memphis will be represented by Ryan Trimm (Southward, Sweet Grass, Next Door), Jackson Kramer (Interim), Rick Farmer & Miles McGrath (St. Jude), and Craig Blondis (Central BBQ). They’ll compete for the title along with Travis Grimes (Husk, Charleston, SC), Michael Scelfo (Alden & Harlow, Boston), and Chad Clevenger & Nick McCormick (Alma Cocina/Tap A Gastropub, Atlanta). So, as it should be, there will be plenty of Memphis faces representing our barbecue traditions, as some fine chefs come in from across the country to show of their skills.

This is sure to be a feast of epic proportions. I highly recommend not missing out. Also, wear comfortable pants…

See you there!

-Thomas

Click below for all of the details and to order tickets!

bbq_320

 

Cochon Heritage BBQ – Meet the Chefs – Todd Mussman

Here’s the last interview I have before the big event. Todd Mussman comes to us from Atlanta and his places Local Three Kitchen and Bar and Muss & Turners. He’s been a part of Cochon events in the past, so he is a natural for this one!

from Local Three website

Here we go!

Cochon Chef Interview

Introduce yourself and let us know a little about you. Thanks! 
I’m Todd Mussman, chef and Partner in both Local Three Kitchen and Bar (2years old) as well as Muss & Turner’s (7 years) , both in metro Atlanta. I’m originally from the Boston area and have lived in Atlanta for about 16 years.

 What lured you into competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ?
I was lucky enough to be a part of the first couple Cochon events here in Atlanta and Brady has been asking me about this for a while…..it sounds fun.

In addition to a competition, Cochon is really about highlighting heritage breed pork. What’s your take on heritage breeds and why they’re important?
We have been using local producers for quite some time, infact one of my team members is also the farmer who raises our hogs, Tommy Searcey.  Really, besides the taste, the fact we are supporting our local small family farms and our community is good enough for me.  Not only knowing where your food came from but who grew it just feels good to us.

What breed of pig will you be using in the competition? Why’d you pick that one?
We are going Yorkshire for Memphis.

What most excites you about your visit to Memphis?
I’ve never been there before so a new place to check out!  Also, pig and Bourbon are two  of my favorite things!

For the Memphis readers, if they were to travel to your town, what three places would you recommend they go to eat?
Shameless plug for my two spots Muss & Turners and Local Three but for the third (I know this is one of Brady’s fav’s too) Tasty China.  Authentic Szechuan Chinese….just unbelievable!

Lastly, rapid fire:

Ribs, dry or wet:  Dry
Barbecue ribs or sandwich:  
sammie
Bourbon – what’s your favorite:  
that’s really hard, we have about 100 at L3….Eagle Rare…
Neat or on the rocks:  
Rocks

Thanks Todd!

Todd is a veteran of the Cochon competitions, so I know he’ll come prepared. With his knowledge, experience, and passion for good food, we’re all in for a treat this afternoon. See you there!

-Thomas

You want to go to there:

Buy your tickets before they sell out!

Cochon Heritage BBQ – Meet the Chefs – Nookie Postal

Here we are on gameday, and I’ve got Nookie Postal on the hotseat. Nookie is the executive chef for the Boston Red Sox, so competition should be right up his alley. If you weren’t familiar, he was a contestant (almost winner) on Around the World in 80 Plates.

Photo by Matthew West, borrowed from the Boston Herald

Here we go!

Cochon Chef Interview

Thomas at Eat Local Memphis – Introduce yourself and let us know a little about you. Thanks!
Nookie Postal – My name is Nookie.  I’m the Exec chef for the Boston Red Sox.  i like long walks in the park, drive in movies and pina coladas… That part is a joke.  not sure if sarcasm really can come through on an email interview…although i do really a mean pina colada..

What lured you into competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ?
I love competition and i love food and specifically pork.  it’s like a match made in heaven. tons of fun and its all for a good cause.

In addition to a competition, Cochon is really about highlighting heritage breed pork. What’s your take on heritage breeds and why they’re important?
Like most of the food in mainstream America, everything is over injected and over medicated and over processed.  I don’t eat that stuff and I don’t feed it to my family.  I’m passionate about raising the best quality animals, and treating them properly.  I think we know so much more know about what factory farming is doing to us and we really need to be going in a different direction.  Cochon is helping that happen.

What breed of pig will you be using in the competition? Why’d you pick that one?
We have a great relationship with a farm in Vermont called Vermont Hertiage Grazers.  She will be supplying us with a Berkshire/Duroc cross.  Gonna be sweet.

What most excites you about your visit to Memphis?
I have never been, so I’m psyched to see the local bbq community.  I’ve heard its a great food scene down there, and of course, my team really wants to visit Graceland..

For the Memphis readers, if they were to travel to your town, what three places would you recommend they go to eat?
Toro, Oleana, Sapporo Ramen

Lastly, rapid fire:

Ribs, dry or wet:  wet
Barbecue ribs or sandwich:  sandi, burnt ends
Bourbon – what’s your favorite:  knob creek
Neat or on the rocks:  rocks

Thanks!

So far the Heritage BBQ weekend has been an awesome one, and I’m super excited to see what Nookie and his team have in store for us this afternoon. He’s another chef that truly believes in the quality of the ingredients and what it means to raise animals appropriately. It is going to be great! See you there!

-Thomas

You want to go to there:

Buy your tickets before they sell out!

 

Cochon Heritage BBQ – Meet the Chefs – Steven Grostick

As part of Cochon Heritage Barbecue week, I reached out to the competing chefs to run a few questions by them, so that we could all get to know the players that will be cooking this weekend.

borrowed from Chef Steven’s Facebook page.

This time, we’ve got Steven Grostick from the Toasted Oak Grill and Market in Novi, Michigan joining us. His team is made up of him, Jeff Bolton from Denver, and Matt Christianson from Portland. Steven’s passion fits in perfectly with the Cochon ideals and made for an awesome interview. I’m not going to spoil too much, because he says it all better than I can. On we go!

Cochon Chef Interview

Introduce yourself and let us know a little about you. Thanks!
I’m Steven Grostick, Executive Chef of Sage Restaurant Group’s Toasted Oak Grill and Market Novi, Michigan (a suburb of Detroit).  I’m a born and bred Michigan Boy with a great passion for knowing where my food comes from and the use of ‘Pure Michigan’ ingredients.

I have practiced pasture-to-fork cooking most of my career, from Michigan harvest vegetables, fresh lake fish, and all of the local farm foods available here; I am deeply rooted in cooking Michigan food. Here’s an example of what I mean:

At the Heritage BBQ, I will be joined by my fellow Sage Restaurant Group chefs Jeff Bolton of Denver’s Second Home and Matt Christianson of Portland’s Urban Farmer.

What lured you into competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ?
Cochon Heritage BBQ is an event envied by many of my colleagues and this competition is a perfect complement to what I practice every day at Toasted Oak –total utilization of a Heritage Breed Hog. We receive 2-4 whole Hogs per month and utilize in BBQ, Michigan-influenced menu items, as well as a wide variety of Charcuterie.  The event speaks to a dying art of butchering in-house and getting creative from snout to tail. Based on all of this, there was no way I would pass up on an opportunity of this nature to help influence and inspire other chefs to practice this in their own restaurants.  Being two-fold, I cannot wait to see what the other chefs competing have to offer so that I may also be inspired.  Being involved in the COCHON555 Tour in Chicago a few years back, I know Brady throws one hell of an event and I cannot wait to see what the Memphis event has to offer!

In addition to a competition, Cochon is really about highlighting heritage breed pork. What’s your take on heritage breeds and why they’re important?
I consider myself very passionate about helping to keep the small farms alive, from produce to meat products.  Heritage breed hogs are important to me for various reasons.  Knowing where your food comes from is the most influential reason of all.  Knowing the practices of the farmer, helping in any way we can as a restaurant to educate our guests in the heritage of the small farms and what they consume gives us all a sense of pride in what we do.  Of course, for those of us who practice this it’s harder than opening a “big box” of pork racks and creating a menu item with better yield and little to no waste, however, it’s worth every bit of the work.

Using heritage breeds helps us stimulate the local economy, keeping small farms in business and keeps us as a restaurant “local.”  Heritage breeds taste better and work better for our individual needs. I would much rather have a hog raised with sun on its back, ears that hang over its eyes, a curly tail and eats from its natural environment than an industrial raised pig with lower fat content which was bread for better yield.  It’s plain and simple, fat is flavor, a fat hog is a happy hog, and in turn makes a great meal!

What breed of pig will you be using in the competition? Why’d you pick that one?
Duroc, I have created a special relationship with this breed as I have helped to raise 4 of them myself.

What most excites you about your visit to Memphis?
BBQ!  I will be frequenting as many joints as I possibly can in the couple of days down there.  And maybe a trip to Graceland if I can fit it in!

For the Memphis readers, if they were to travel to your town, what three places would you recommend they go to eat?
Of course, you all need to come and meet us at Toasted Oak Grill and Market in Novi, Michigan.  The Root Restaurant and Bar in White Lake, Michigan also feels the same way we do about food and they do a great job practicing local Michigan fare.  Zingerman’s Roadhouse in Ann Arbor, Michigan is an outstanding BBQ joint (for us Michiganders!) ,and the Union Woodshop in Clarkston, Michigan is also a top spot.

Lastly, rapid fire:

Ribs, dry or wet: Dry
Barbecue ribs or sandwich:
Ribs
Bourbon – what’s your favorite:
Traverse City Whiskey Company, Straight Bourbon
Neat or on the rocks:
Neat, puts hair on your chest.

Thanks!!

Two things are clear to me after this conversation with Steven. First, I can’t wait to see what his team puts together this weekend, as I know it will be awesome. Second, I’m going to find a way to get to the Toasted Oak ASAP.

But, aside from my desire for food (as Jenna Mulrooney on 30 Rock would say, “me want food”), what really struck me was his passion for the heritage breeds and the local farmers. Supporting those ideals as consumers makes it easier for chefs to use those products and for farmers to make them. It is a cycle that really starts with us asking for (and paying for) the best, whether that is the best flavor, the best breeds of animals, the best varieties of produce, the best farming conditions, or whatever. The farmers and chefs all want to provide it, but it is up to us to make it known that we want it and are willing to pay for it. To me, it is worth it every time.

I can’t wait for the weekend. See you there!

-Thomas

You want to go to there:

Buy your tickets before they sell out!

Heritage BBQ – The Scoop

Here’s the deal with Cochon Heritage BBQ. Take Labor Day weekend add in our awesome city, the barbeque capital of the world, and you’ve got a pretty awesome weekend. Here’s the word from Brady Lowe, who is putting on the event this weekend:

From Friday, August 31 through Sunday, September 2, 2012, we will join other chefs and barbeque enthusiasts to fire up our smokers and sharpen our knives as we take over Memphis for a weekend of pork-themed events including eating challenges; tasting experiences; special dinners; a heritage pork pop-up restaurant; a 5.55k fun run; educational cheese and pairings seminars; and the Heritage BBQ main event – a friendly but competitive BBQ cook-off featuring a line-up of the country’s top chefs and their teams duking it out for pork glory. We invite you to join us for this ultimate celebration of heritage pork and National Bourbon Month!  Tickets for the event are between $50 and $125 and are still available on the website: www.heritagebbq.com

-Brady

I’ll be there for a lot of it, and I’m super excited about it. Cochon 555 was one of the most exciting events that I’ve ever been to, and Heritage BBQ is taking it to a whole new level. It is going to be great to see so many of Memphis’ great chefs getting together with awesome chefs from across the country. You know the food is going to be awesome. See you there!

-Thomas

Cochon Heritage BBQ – Meet the Chefs – Ryan Trimm of Sweet Grass

As part of Cochon Heritage Barbecue week, I reached out to the competing chefs to run a few questions by them, so that we could all get to know the players that will be cooking this weekend.

This time, we’ve got Ryan Trimm of Sweet Grass and Sweet Grass Next Door (I totally just realized that I don’t write enough about these places considering how often I go…) fame on the hot seat. Ryan is really great for our food community. Listening talk about why he does what he does and what is important to him, you can really tell that he has an amazing vision for what he and his team will accomplish.

From a food standpoint, Sweet Grass is so consistently excellent that it is crazy. I literally ordered something different every time I went for the first 5-6 times, and I was amazed each time. For those wondering, the first dish that I cycled back to was the osso bucco, trust me.

borrowed from the Sweet Grass Facebook page.

On a barbecue note, Ryan did a preview of the Heritage BBQ event at Cochon 555. After all the eating from the competition was done, Brady Lowe announced that Heritage BBQ was coming to Memphis, and Ryan had whipped up an amazing barbecue feast. His cuban sandwiches, ribs, barbecue spaghetti, and beans are still on the top of my mind. His team is going to be ready, I can tell you that…

Cochon Chef Interviews

Thomas (Eat Local Memphis) – What lured you into competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ?
Ryan Trimm – Heritage BBQ is an event that represents a lot of what I believe in already.  It would be great to see a bbq restaurant that utilizes the whole animal.  If that bbq restaurant went through two heritage pigs a week, it would mean 100 more pigs from a heritage farmer.  That is a big number and a huge help. *TR note on this below.

In addition to a competition, Cochon is really about highlighting heritage breed pork. What’s your take on heritage breeds and why they’re important?
There are two obvious reasons for me.  First, is the product quality alone.  The taste, texture and flavor are all second to none.  Using heritage breed pigs makes my job easier.  As a cook, it is important for me to always start with the best ingredients.  I’ve been buying pigs from Mark Newman for two years now, and I can promise you that every pig I’ve bought has been first class.  Second, it is important to know where your product comes from.  Not just from what farm, but where it went in between.  I like being able to cut out most of the processing and knowing that I personally broke the pig down.

What breed of pig will you be using in the competition? Why’d you pick that one?
I will be using Newman Farm Berkshire Pig.  That is what I have always preferred.  I think the quality is second to none.

Why is Cochon good for Memphis?
Memphis is just breaking into the culinary scene of the Southeast, and we really haven’t received a ton of publicity nationally.  Cochon 555 and Heritage BBQ will help surge Memphis into a spotlight for Southern cuisine.

At the last Cochon a friend of mine said that this is Memphis’ time as a food city. What’s your take on it?
I completely agree.  New Orleans and Atalnta have had their time on stage.  Charleston continues to grow and receive more recognition.  Memphis is constantly growing and molding into what should define our city as a culinary destination.  I feel the growth and change is one of the most exciting times for a food city.

If you don’t mind sharing, where do you go in Memphis to deal with your barbecue fix?
Payne’s for a sandwich.

Lastly, rapid fire:

Ribs, dry or wet: dry
Barbecue ribs or sandwich: ribs
Bourbon – what’s your favorite: Eagle Rare 17yr old (but the 10 yr old is also great)
Neat or on the rocks: one big rock

Thanks a lot to Ryan for filling us in. I want to jump in where he imagined a barbecue place that used two heritage breed whole hogs per week. When Brady Lowe was describing his vision for Heritage BBQ, he asked, what if there was a $10 barbecue sandwich that was made by a chef and was made with the best possible ingredients. When that happens, the heritage breed farmers will be able to raise/sell more pigs, and we will all win. It would be great for the farmers, the chefs, and the eaters. Here’s to it!

I can’t wait for the weekend. See you there!

-Thomas

You want to go to there:

Buy your tickets before they sell out!

You want to go to there:

Sweet Grass and Sweet Grass Next Door
937 South Cooper Street
Memphis, TN
(901) 278-0278

 

Cochon Heritage BBQ – Meet the Chefs – Harrison Keevil

As part of Cochon Heritage Barbecue week, I reached out to the competing chefs to run a few questions by them, so that we could all get to know the players that will be cooking this weekend.

This time, I caught up with Harrison Keevil, who comes to Memphis from Charlottesville and his Brookeville Restaurant. So, hopefully, all of you UVA grads will know the scoop already. Really, could you imagine a more idyllic setting to live and work than Charlottesville? Totally awesome place with nice scenery and some sweet, sweet lax.

Anyway, on to the interview with Harrison!

Cochon Chef Interviews

Thomas (Eat Local Memphis) – Introduce yourself and let us know a little about you. Thanks!
Harrison Keevil – My name is Harrison Keevil and I am the Chef/Co-Owner of Brookville Restaurant. I run the Kitchen and my Wife runs the FOH as well as being the other co-owner. We have been open a little over 2 years and our ingredient based cuisine and focus on using products sourced from within 100 miles of Charlottesville ( we are about 85-90% locally sourced). I am a graduate of the University of Virginia and the French Culinary Institute. I have worked in NYC, SF, and London until I came home to Virginia where I worked at the Clifton Inn until opening Brookville. 

What lured you into competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ?
I believe in the message of Cochon. The utilization of whole Heritage Breed Pigs is something we take very seriously at Brookville and to be a part of an event that is centered on that principal is thus very important to us. I am competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ to help raise awareness that using whole heritage breed pigs is doable. That in turn helps the farmers from whom we get these majestic animals. Without the farmer we would have nothing.

In addition to a competition, Cochon is really about highlighting heritage breed pork. What’s your take on heritage breeds and why they’re important?
They are most important because they taste like pork is supposed to. Each breed brings something different to the table but the most important and unifying quality of all the breeds is flavor. Most people in the US don’t know what pork really tastes like. So it is our responsibility to educate in order to create a larger demand for flavor.

What breed of pig will you be using in the competition? Why’d you pick that one?
I will be using a 100% Certified Berkshire. I mainly chose this breed to pay homage to my British heritage. Growing up spending my summers in England this is the breed that was most readily available in my Grandparents little village. By using the Berkshire I feel that I am paying respect to my family which will translate to the respect that I show to the pig by utilizing all of it. The reality is that this pig has given its life for us and to not use all of it would be disrespectful to the pig and the farmer that loved and cared for it.

What most excites you about your visit to Memphis?
I’m excited to work and learn from other chefs. In my kitchen at Brookville I am the only cook, and this event is an opportunity for me to learn from and be inspired by my fellow competitors and the flavors, sites, sounds and smells of Memphis.

For the Memphis readers, if they were to travel to your town, what three places would you recommend they go to eat?
First I would hope that they come visit me and my wife at Brookville, but after that I would send them to C&O where Dean Maupin is the Chef. I would then send them to The Clifton Inn to try Tucker Yoders fare. Finally, for something a little different I would sent them to see Tomas Rahal at MAS.

Lastly, rapid fire:

Ribs, dry or wet: dry
Barbecue ribs or sandwich: Ribs
Bourbon – what’s your favorite: There are too many great ones to have a favorite.
Neat or on the rocks: Depends on the Bourbon

Thanks!

I’m really excited to have Harrison coming to Memphis for this competition. He has such respect for tradition, history, and the life of the animals that he uses. That respect is bound to make it into the dishes his team prepares. I hope that anyone that is reading from Charlottesville or around there will make a trip over to Brookeville and report back to us!

I can’t wait for the weekend. See you there!

-Thomas

You want to go to there:

Buy your tickets before they sell out!

You want to go to there:

Brookeville Restaurant
225 W Main St.
Charlottesville Va, 22903
434-202-2791

 

Cochon Heritage BBQ – Meet the Chefs – The Farmer and The Chef – Miles McMath

As part of Cochon Heritage Barbecue week, I reached out to the competing chefs to run a few questions by them, so that we could all get to know the players that will be cooking this weekend.

The Chef – Miles McMath – photo borrowed from Edible Memphis article on Chef McMath – read that article by clicking the photo!

First up is Miles McMath from team The Farmer and The Chef. Miles is teaming with Mark and Rita Newman (read about them here) to put together an awesome team at Cochon.

The Farmer – Mark Newman of Newman Farm

Miles is the head chef at St. Jude, so he has the distinction of both being local and cooking at one of the best organizations in the world. I’m excited to see what he brings to the competition. I know that by teaming up with the Newmans, he’ll be working with an awesome pig.

Cochon Chef Interviews

Thomas (Eat Local Memphis) – What lured you into competing in Cochon Heritage BBQ? 
Miles McMath – Heritage Pork, Bourbon and some of the best Famers, Artisans and Chefs all in one place, need I say more.

In addition to a competition, Cochon is really about highlighting heritage breed pork. What’s your take on heritage breeds and why they’re important?
These traditional breeds are an essential part of the American agricultural inheritance. Not only do they evoke our past, they are also an important resource for our future.

What breed of pig will you be using in the competition?  
Berkshire.  

Why’d you pick that one?
I guess I’m bias since I have Berkshire and Mulefoot pigs.  My Berkshire Boar “Buddy” is truly a remarkable animal.  He actually has become the family pet.  But the real reason is not the actual heritage breed as much as Newman Farms itself.  Mark and Rita are incredible Farmers doing an incredible job.

Why is Cochon good for Memphis?
It’s a great way to celebrate the people who work tirelessly to raise, source and cook some of the best food in the country. Cochon also creates awareness as well as the importance of knowing where our food comes from.

At the last Cochon a friend of mine said that this is Memphis’ time as a food city. What’s your take on it?
To me Memphis has always been a food city.  It’s just now there are Outstanding Chefs such as Andy, Michael, Ryan, Wally Jo, Felicia, Kelly and many others that are getting the city and local food the recognition it deserves.  But also, it’s Farmers like Mark Newman that are working their butts off to supply Chefs in the city with the quality that wasn’t easily accessed 20 years ago.

If you don’t mind sharing, where do you go in Memphis to deal with your barbecue fix? 
Well, there’s a few:  Central, Toms, Cozy Corner, Payne’s and Bosses I would say are at the top of my list.  However, there are not too many bad ones.

Lastly, rapid fire:

Ribs, dry or wet:  Dry
Barbecue ribs or sandwich:  Sandwich with Mustard Slaw
Bourbon – what’s your favorite:  Wild Turkey
Neat or on the rocks:  Swigs

Thanks a lot to Miles for giving us a look behind the scenes with his team. What I love about Cochon is that it isn’t just a focus on the chefs or the food but also on the people that make the ingredients possible. Cochon Heritage Barbecue is going to be an amazing event that really opens some eyes (and mouths) about what is possible with our city’s favorite food.

I can’t wait for the weekend. See you there!

-Thomas

You want to go to there:

Buy your tickets before they sell out!

The Prince

So, Cochon 555 was 9 days ago, and it still feels like yesterday. I kind of feel like Will Farrell in Old School, when he finishes his debate.

So, now that I’ve come to after a Cochon-induced blackout, I can safely say that February 4 was one of the best culinary experiences of my life. In one awesome room downtown, there were 5 chefs who put a ton of skill and effort into turning 5 well-bred and well-raised heritage breed pigs into delicious food for about 500 people. Successes all around.

I could go on and on about some of the dishes that I had at the event, but instead I really just want to pass on some props to a couple of people. I’m going to break this into two posts, this one for the Memphians and the next for our out of town brethren.

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